Woodruff's Art Center

Open 362 Days A Year! Monday-Saturday 9-5, Sunday 11-5

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Woodruff's Art Center

Woodruff's Art Center is one of the few independent art supply stores on Cape Cod and we appreciate your business. We strive to carry a unique full line of art supplies suitable for the professional, student and hobbyist not found at the "big box" stores. We also carry architectural and drafting supplies, and an assortment of children's art and craft materials. Obviously we can't stock everything…so we welcome special orders. We want to inspire "artful behavior." We have a knowledgeable staff of artists to help you seven days a week. Come back soon, we like to highlight different supplies and techniques on this page, the content changes, you never know what new cool stuff you'll find here!



40% Off Everyday


Classic Cotton Stretched Canvas
An all-purpose canvas, Classic Cotton Stretched Canvas is great for traditional painting techniques as well as mixed media, aerosol art, home decor and craft project and is suitable for use with all acrylic paints, oil paints and other wet or dry media. The unbleached 5 oz. cotton duck is primed with acid-free acrylic titanium gesso to a finished weight of 10 oz. and stretched around kiln-dried solid pine stretcher bars. The canvas is held in place with a flexible spline allowing for painting on all four edges and hanging with or without a frame. Sizes with a dimension of 24" or longer are braced for additional support. Available in three profile depths: Studio Canvases have a 3/4" deep profile, Gallery canvases have a 1-3/8" deep profile and Deep Canvases have a 2-1/4" deep profile. Gallery and Deep profiles provide additional strength and support, especially for larger sizes.


Akua Intaglio Ink
These soy-based inks deliver brilliant colors, intense blacks and unmatched working properties. The inks only dry through absorption so they will not skin over in the jar or dry on the printmaking plate. Clean up is easy with soap and water. These inks are ideal for intaglio, etching, monotype, relief and collagraph printmaking and can be used with Akua Liquid Pigment (SPAKLY) and Akua Modifiers.



The Art of CorrespondenseStrathmore Creative Greeting Cards



Strathmore¬ģ has great ways for artists to create and send unique, hand decorated greetings.


Their best-selling Creative Card line features artist quality papers and comes in different sizes to enhance the creative process. They're ideal for watercolor, gouache, acrylic, graphite, pen and ink, colored pencil, marker and collage. They inspire recreational and professional artists to communicate and share their talent.





Art Bars by Derwent

With a beautiful creamy consistency, these triangular bars of solid, highly pigmented colour offer the artist so much creative potential. They feel luxuriously smooth as they release consistently rich, deep pigment. The wax based bars are also completely water-soluble and dry marks almost seem to melt under your brush. Used either dry or wet, Artbar opens up a world of expressive mark making and rich opaque colour.

Woodruff's has the 12, 24, 36 and 72 bar set in stock now!



Encaustic Painting Through The Ages

Encaustic painting is one of the world's oldest art forms! The earliest applications of encaustic wax paint was done by the artists of Ancient Greece. Greek artists were using wax paint to adorn sculptures, murals, boats, and even architecture. Greek art spread to Egypt during the Hellenistic period and Egyptians started to incorporate encaustic paint into their paintings as well as mummification practices. As encaustic painting flourished in Greece and Egypt, it was also inevitable to spread to Rome. Pliny, the Roman historian, wrote in 1st century C.E. that encaustic wax paint was being used in the Roman portraits and mythology paintings done on panels. Pliny also noted that it was a popular trend of Roman aristocrats to possess encaustic paintings in their villas leading us to believe that encaustic paint did hold popularity and prestige. After the Roman Empire fell, artists began turning to cheaper, quicker paint instead of the encaustic paint because the ancient heating process was so laborious for the wax. So for quite some time encaustic paint was pretty much under the radar.

During the Middle Ages, more artists turned to tempera, fresco, and oil painting techniques that did not require the cumbersome task of building charcoal fires which, was required to liquefy the wax paints. However, although encaustic painting declined, it was not abandoned completely.

It wasn't until the 18th century when archeologists began looking into the process of encaustic painting and in-depth research began. It was during this time that the beautifully preserved walls of Pompeii were discovered exhibiting encaustic paintings. Europe quickly caught on with the encaustic medium and artists like Joseph-Marie Vien, Alexandre Roslin, Louis-Joseph Le Lorain and Jean-Jacques Bachelier began exhibiting their own encaustic works in France. By the mid 19th century, encaustic techniques were commonly used in murals throughout Europe. However, without modern heating tools, encaustic paintings still included a long heating process and therefore, did not significantly rise in popularity. In the 1950's and 1960's, Jasper Johns became one the first few artists who displayed his encaustic artwork in the "mainstream". He helped bring the medium closer to the forefront of the art community and gained a lot of attention for his flag series of encaustic paintings. Most of his artworks featured simple schema designs like flags, maps, letters, and he became one of the most widely exhibited artists of our time.

Today, the encaustics is experiencing a resurgence and is becoming a favorite of contemporary artists, students, and professionals alike. Today's technology means getting involved in the encaustic medium has never been so simple. Encaustic paintings are limitless and you can paint abstract or detailed drawings using the wax. You can mix your own colors, create textures or smooth surfaces, and design some unique sculptural effects. Within minutes, you can make delicate laying of thin transparent glazes or heavy impasto textures. Not to mention, you can also work in an additive and subtractive fashion, building layers as you go, and drying time is not an issue. Mixed media artists even find that encaustic paint is perfect for adhering objects to for collage effects.

Woodruff's has Enkaustikos Encaustic Wax Paint, below is an introductory video tutorial about the medium.